Tenderfoot

I see, therefore I believe

Author

Vivienne Glance is a poet, playwright and performer. Her poetry has appeared in journals, anthologies and online publications, and she has won places and commendations in competitions.

She has published 2 collections: The Softness of Water (Sunline Press 2009), and A Simple Rain with photography by Perdita Phillips (Lethologica Press 2012) and has a PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Western Australia.

Vivienne's latest play, The Cat in the Box, was produced at the Blue Room Theatre, Perth, in August 2012.

 

by Vivienne Glance

in the darkest light before dawn
blinded by absence and dreams
in the physics of the moment
invisibility transports you to me
you show me more than I need
unsighted you insist you can see

unsighted you insist on your vision
in the darkest light before dawn
you show me more than I need
blinded by absence and dreams
invisibility transports you to me
in the physics of the moment

in the physics of luminosity
unsighted you insist on your vision
invisibility transports you to me
in the darkest light before dawn
blinded by absence and dreams
you show me more than I need

you show me so much I am lost
in the physics of luminosity
blinded by absence and dreams
unsighted you insist on your vision
in the darkest light before dawn
invisibility transports you to me

invisibility is incandescent
you show me so much I am lost
in the darkest light before dawn
in the physics of luminosity
unsighted you insist on your vision
blinded by absence and dreams

blinded by absence and distance
invisibility is incandescent
unsighted you insist on your vision
you show me so much you lose me
in the physics of luminosity
in the darkest light before dawn

in the physics of the moment
I see, therefore I believe

in the darkest light before dawn
I believe

 

Exegesis

'I see, therefore I believe' is based on the sestina poetic form. That is, it has a regular rhyming structure and a systematic repetition of lines. I have slightly changed the language throughout the repetitions, a practice that is perhaps more acceptable in contemporary poetry than it was in the past. Also, I have altered the form by adding two final couplets.

The poem emerged from a contemplation of light: how it is a physical entity that has properties and obeys physical laws; how it enables us to see objects and people; the way its cultural resonances are reflected in our references to light in language and mythologies, including an absence of light and blindness.

The six lines that form the structure of the poem were each written around these different aspects of light. It is my hope that each line on a particular aspect of light resonates with the reader. As the lines change and the language fluctuates, it is my hope that the juxtaposition of images and ideas will create new contemplations of light and the complex and diverse relationships we have with it.

The pair of final couplets aims to focus the reader on the two opposing rational and metaphysical views of the world. However, both of these are based around belief of one kind or another.